ISSN 2051-8315
Psychopathology Review
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 Volume 2, Issue 1, 17-29, 2015
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Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Authors
  Emily Gentes - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & The VA Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center; Durham, NC, USA
  Paul Dennis - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & VA Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care; Durham, NC, USA
  Nathan Kimbrel - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA
  Angela Kirby - The VA Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center; Durham, NC, USA
  Lauren Hair - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & VA Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care; Durham, NC, USA
  Jean Beckham - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA
  Patrick Calhoun - Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Durham, NC, USA. & VA Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care; Durham, NC, USA

Volume 2, Issue 1, 2015, Pages 17-29
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/pr.035914

Abstract
The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor “dysphoria” model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Method
 Participants
 Measures
  Demographics.
  Trauma Exposure.
  Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale.
  Items to Assess New DSM-5 Criteria.
  Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV.
 Data Analysis
Results
Discussion
 Limitations and Future Directions
 Summary and Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References

Correspondence to
Patrick Calhoun, VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC, Durham VA Medical Center, 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC 27705.

Keywords
DSM-5, posttraumatic stress disorder, latent factor structure, CFA

Dates
Received 6 Feb 2014; Revised 9 Jul 2014; Accepted 10 Jul 2014; In Press 14 Feb 2015







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